Geranium (Hardy Crane's Bill)

The term “geranium” is confusing. The geranium most gardeners encounter is not a geranium at all. Crane’s Bill is the true or hardy perennial geranium. The Greek translation of geranium refers to the shape of the flower buds, resembling the beak and head of a crane. Hence ...
The term “geranium” is confusing. The geranium most gardeners encounter is not a geranium at all. Crane’s Bill is the true or hardy perennial geranium. The Greek translation of geranium refers to the shape of the flower buds, resembling the beak and head of a crane. Hence the common name, Crane’s Bill. The foliage is toothed and attractive, and the flowers float on top of the plant in shades of white, pink, magenta, purple and blue. It is an excellent border plant valued for its long bloom period.

It is easily grown in well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. It appreciates some afternoon shade in hot, humid areas. You can pinch the plant back heavily after flowering to encourage blooms throughout the summer, but dead-heading is tedious and probably unnecessary. The foliage may start to decline in hot summer climates, at which point it may be lightly sheared back. It can be used very effectively as a ground cover, and varies in stature and habit, but typically grows as a mounded clump. Some varieties are notorious self-seeders and will spread.

To plant bare root perennials, dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the root meets the stem) is about 1-2” below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly.

Supplied as #1 sized bare root. Tags are included with bare root perennials from DeGroot.
Show More
Show Less