Brussels Sprouts

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Although not commonly found in home gardens and at Farmers’ Markets, Brussels Sprouts deserves consideration. They take a long time to mature, ...
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Although not commonly found in home gardens and at Farmers’ Markets, Brussels Sprouts deserves consideration. They take a long time to mature, but the wait is worth it. Brussels Sprouts are highly nutritious, and will provide home gardeners a special tasty treat in late fall and early winter. For growers, they offer a fresh market vegetable that can be offered to customers late in the season, when all other locally grown vegetables have disappeared.

Growing Tips: Brussels Sprouts are grown much the same way as broccoli, but timed for a late fall/early winter harvest, as the quality improves after freezing weather. Sprouts mature from the bottom up. Remove lower leaves as they yellow, and first pick sprouts at the bottom of the stalk. When lower sprouts are removed, the higher ones will mature more quickly.

Fresh Market Grower Tips:
Although Brussels sprouts can be strong flavored when harvested before fall frosts, they become sweet, delicately flavored “little cabbages” after cool fall weather sets in. In fact, Brussels sprouts can be harvested and enjoyed even after freezing temperatures have eliminated most other crops. Encourage your customers tosteam, sauté, or roast sprouts for delicious fall and winter dishes.

1. Time your planting for a cold weather harvest.
2. If you plan to harvest whole stalks, cut off the plant’s top4-5 weeks before harvest. This hastens maturity of the upper sprouts.
3. Before harvest, snap off leaves at the stalk to make harvest and sprout removal quicker and cleaner.
4. Cut whole stalks for easy transport from the field.
5. To harvest sprouts over multiple pickings, snap off sprouts from bottom to top.

Days to Maturity are from transplanting and should only be used as a guide to variety comparison.



Average Seed Count: 75 per packet; 115,000/Lb.


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