Wisteria

Wisteria is probably one of the best-loved climbing plants. It needs space and a sturdy support structure on which to grow, and may be slow to establish, though it may produce flowers by the second or third year after planting. In contrast to the very similar Japanese wisteria ...
Wisteria is probably one of the best-loved climbing plants. It needs space and a sturdy support structure on which to grow, and may be slow to establish, though it may produce flowers by the second or third year after planting. In contrast to the very similar Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda), Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) differs by counterclockwise twining, fewer leaflets per leaf, and shorter less fragrant flowers that bloom simultaneously on each raceme. It is considered a high maintenance plant because of its need for regular pruning, and it can be invasive.

Failure of vines to produce flowers may be attributable to a number of causes including: death of flower buds during the winter, too much shade, plants are too young, improper pruning or over-fertilization. An application of superphosphate in early spring can help stimulate flowering. Choose growing sites wisely because it dislikes being transplanted.

It is best grown in slightly acidic, organic-rich, moderately fertile, well-drained soils in full sun. To plant bare root perennials, dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the root meets the stem) is about 1-2” below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly.

Supplied as 12-18” bare root. 
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