Carrot

Developed from the wildflower Queen Anne’s Lace, the carrot has been cultivated for centuries in Europe. Rich in calcium, vitamin A, and fiber, carrots are very easy to grow and come in many shapes and sizes. Imperator carrots are the long, smooth, slim types found in supermarkets. ...
Developed from the wildflower Queen Anne’s Lace, the carrot has been cultivated for centuries in Europe. Rich in calcium, vitamin A, and fiber, carrots are very easy to grow and come in many shapes and sizes. Imperator carrots are the long, smooth, slim types found in supermarkets. Nantes carrots are slender in shape with rounded ends, or stump roots. Chantenay carrots are broad at the top with a tapering shape and rounded end. For local fresh market, we recommend the Nantes and Chantenay type hybrids for exceptional sweetness, flavor and color.

Growing Tips: A stone-free sandy loam is best for carrots. Raised beds with minimal compaction work well, also. Where soil is more firm or clay-like, the shorter varieties are advisable. Germination takes 2-3 weeks and early growth is slow. Seed is very fine, so thinning will need to be done. [Try our pelleted seed for precision planting.] As plants near maturity, throwing loose soil over root crowns during cultivation will reduce green shoulders. Pull only what you need, as mature carrots will retain quality in the ground unless weather is extremely hot and dry.

Storage Tips: As with other root crops, carrots store well after harvesting and can retain much of their vitamin A up to six months. To store, cut off tops 1-2 above the root and place in a cool, moist area (32°F., 95% relative humidity). Carrots can be stored in large plastic bags with air holes, or in boxes of moist sand, wood chips or peat. Do not store them with apples or other fresh fruit. Small, tender carrots can also be frozen.

Fresh Market Grower Tips:
Fresh carrots are customer favorites at Farmers’ Markets and roadside stands, as they are familiar, sweet, simple to prepare, and kid-pleasing. We offer many Nantes types, as we feel that they provide superior quality and appearance for fresh market sales. However, Royal Chantenay is a good choice for very heavy soils, and you might try Kuroda for a delightfully sweet, shorter carrot for fresh eating or juicing. Or raise Sweet Baby Jane to offer your customers tender, sweet bunched baby carrots, an appealing alternative to the cut and peeled baby carrots found in grocery stores.

Culture:
A deeply-tilled sandy loam or organic soil with a pH of 6.0-6.8 is best for carrots. Raised beds with minimal compaction work well, and timely watering is advisable. Weoffer pelleted seed for precision planting. Germination takes 2-3 weeks, and early growth is slow. As carrots near maturity, throw loose soil over root crowns during cultivation to reduce green shoulders. After harvest, topped carrots remain in excellent condition for many weeks if kept cold and moist (35° F and 95% relative humidity). To prevent bitter flavor, do not store with apples or other fruits that give off natural ethylene gas.

Average Seed Count:
Raw Seed - 1,000/Pkt; 19,000/Oz.; 175,000-390,000/Lb.
Pelleted Seed - 350/Pkt; 3,000 - 5,000/Oz.


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