Cauliflower

View Quick Facts Chart

Cauliflower, another of the cole crop vegetables, has remained pretty much the same over the years for high nutritional value and flavor. ...
View Quick Facts Chart

Cauliflower, another of the cole crop vegetables, has remained pretty much the same over the years for high nutritional value and flavor. Modern breeding has improved head configurations, foliage cover (self wrap types) and brought us some new exciting colors other than white. Cauliflower is an exceptional vegetable either cooked or fresh in salads or as a hors d’oeuvre. The new purple and yellow/orange color head types are perfect choices for fresh market sales at public markets.

Growing Tips: Similar to broccoli in many respects, this member of the cabbage family produces best when maturing during cool weather. It can be direct seeded, but is generally handled as a transplant, with seedlings being planted in early July for a fall harvest. Cauliflower is best when grown rapidly and with plenty of moisture.
When heads reach golf ball size, they should be “blanched” to preserve their white color. To blanch, gather outer leaves over white heads and secure with twine or rubber bands. Check regularly to harvest at peak maturity before they loosen up. Some types of cauliflower are known as “self-blanching”. Their leaves curl naturally over the head and therefore do not need to be secured.

Fresh Market Grower Tips:
Cauliflower is a very popular item for fresh, roadside and farmers’ market sales, and good quality brings an excellent price. It’s closely related to broccoli and just as easy to grow when a few important points are remembered:

1. Choose varieties adapted to your area and conditions.
2. For best quality, time planting so that heads mature in cool weather.
3. To prevent premature heading, do not expose young transplants to cold temperatures.
4. Keep pH near 7.0, and pay attention to soil nutrients including trace elements like boron, magnesium, and molybdenum.
5. Water regularly to prevent severe checks in growth that will damage head quality.
6. If you grow varieties that are not self-wrapping, “blanch” heads to prevent curd yellowing. Gather outer leaves and tie with string or rubber bands when heads are golf ball size.
7. Monitor tied heads closely to ensure harvest at peak maturity, before curd loosens.

Avg. Seed Count: 75/Pkt. 7200/Oz.

Average Seed Count: 75 per packet; 7200/Oz.


Show More
Show Less