Squash, Summer

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Grow summer squash from seeds and you have a delicious staple for home gardens, at roadside stands and at farmers’ markets all summer long! Zucchini, ...
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Grow summer squash from seeds and you have a delicious staple for home gardens, at roadside stands and at farmers’ markets all summer long! Zucchini, yellow summer squash and specialty summer squash are delicious all-time favorites that include crookneck, straightneck, scalloped, and patty pan type varieties. From fall decor to the table, these squash seed varieties are worth getting excited about! Many of our squash seeds are available with virus tolerance and also come with organic seed options.

Growing tips:
Summer Squash varieties are prolific and hardy. The fruit, picked at an early stage, have tender skin, white flesh and small seeds — all edible. Zucchini is the most widely grown summer squash. Others gaining in popularity are the scalloped and crookneck shaped varieties. If you do not have a traditional large garden, many summer squash varieties are good for small space gardens and can be grown in large containers (half barrels). As long as they are bush types, they will do fine with proper care.

Fresh Market Grower Tips:
There is a wondrous diversity of squash types available now for pick-your-own, roadside and local fresh market growers. They range from yellow and green bush summer squashes through the bush and semi-vining acorns to the long-vined butternuts and large winter squashes. Some are used immediately as mini-vegetables and hors d’oeuvres while others are storage types. Whatever your market and whenever the need, we have the squash for you!

Culture:
Any well-drained fertile soil will grow squash with the proper management. As a group, they are warm weather crops quite sensitive to cold temperatures, so wait for warm soil to plant. Planting pattern and area covered will depend on the bush/vining plant habit of the particular varieties you choose to grow. Plastic mulch can be used to raise soil temperature, conserve moisture and control weeds. Use supplemental water if plants start to wilt and add bees for pollination. Finally, harvest carefully at peak maturity to avoid declining quality. Those winter types that will store well are best held at 50-55° F. and50-75% relative humidity with good air circulation. Maturities are from field seeding and are intended for comparison only.

Average Seed Count: 30 per packet; 4,000/Lb.
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